Peer-reviewing encourages p-hacking

I’m sure I’m not the first to notice, but it seems to me that peer-review encourages p-hacking. Try this: (1) pre-register your analysis of a regression analysis before doing the analysis and writing the paper (in your lab notes, or actually on OSF). (2) Do the analysis, and (3) submit. How often do we get recommendations or demands to change the model during the peer-reviewing process? How about controlling for X, should you not do Y, or you should do Z, etc.

Unless we’re looking at a pre-registered report, we’re being asked to change the model. Typically we don’t know whether these suggestions are based on theory or the empirical results. In the former case, we should probably do a new pre-registration and redo the analysis. Sometimes we catch important things like post-treatment bias… In the latter case, simply resist?

And as reviewers, we should probably be conscious of this (in addition to the additional work we’re asking authors to do, because we know that at this stage authors will typically do anything to get the paper accepted).

Photo credit: CC-by GotCredithttps://flic.kr/p/Sc7Dmi

 

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