Collaborative writing in SciFlow now with Zotero

This deserves mentioning: The collaborating writing service SciFlow now supports Zotero. You can find instructions here and here; all you need is an account with Zotero for syncing. Like the Mendeley link they provide, fetching references from the connected (Zotero) account can be a bit sluggish if you have a large library. If you’re a student writing up a term paper or a Master thesis, you will probably not notice this. If you have a more substantial collection of references, you will notice this. A downside of the Zotero link is that it searches your complete library, including notes and extracted annotations if you have this. I would have liked a more selective sync to speed up things.

So I’m still waiting for a reference search like in Authorea or ZoteroBib. With the many export styles to choose from, SciFlow easily beats Google Docs, and it works in a limited way on a mobile phone (you can log in and edit the text, but formatting etc. are now disabled in recent versions).

S-SAM 3rd Call for Exchanges and Pilot Studies Closing 15 September 2019

Here’s a reminder that the third call for exchanges and pilot studies is still open until 15 September 2019.

In this third call, we focus on:

    – The role of limited and contradictory information in decisions to migrate.
    – Aspirations and abilities to migrate, including the nature of different ‘pull’ effects and the choice of destination country and how they change according to context. Includes questions of preparation, anticipation of problems ‘enroute’ and in destination country (e.g. discrimination).
    – Quantitative analysis of Afrobarometer or other suitable data on aspirations and abilities to migrate.
    – Quantitative or experimental analysis of migration decisions when facing limited or contradictory information.
    – Research on the role of trust in migration decisions.
    – Novel research on student migration from Subsaharan Africa to Switzerland and Europe, as a specific motivation to migrate.

You are at the transition from PhD to established researcher: either a late PhD (typically last year), or early postdoctoral researcher (typically first or second year). You are embedded in a university in a Subsaharan African country or in Switzerland, and study human migration in any relevant discipline.

http://www.unine.ch/sfm/home/formation/ssam.html

How well do correspondence tests measure discrimination?

Correspondence tests are a useful field experiement to measure discrimination in the formal labour market. These correspondence tests are also known as CV experiements: Researchers send two equivalent applications to an employer, differening only in the quantity of interest — gender and ethnicity are common. If only the majority or male candidate is invited for a job interview, we probably have a case of discrimination. Once we aggreate across many employers, we’re pretty confident to have captured discrimination.

Most studies stop there, declining any offer to reduce the burden on employers. The hiring process, however, does not end there. Lincoln Quillian and his team have now compiled a list of studies that went further. They find that the first stage of screening is far from the end of discrimination, and the job interview can increase overall discrimination substantially. Correspondece tests focusing on the first stage will capture only some of the discrimination. Interestingly the discrimination at the job interview stage appears unrelated to discrimination at the first screening of applications.

Quillian, L., Lee, J., & Oliver, M. (2018). Meta-Analysis of Field Experiments Shows Significantly More Racial Discrimination in Job Offers than in Callbacks. Northwestern Workin Paper Series, 18(28). Retrieved from https://www.ipr.northwestern.edu/publications/papers/2018/wp-18-28.html

Zschirnt, E., & Ruedin, D. (2016). Ethnic discrimination in hiring decisions: A meta-analysis of correspondence tests 1990–2015. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 42(7), 1115–1134. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2015.1133279

Image: CC-by Richard Eriksson.

CAS 2019-2020 Migration and Diversity: Apply Now!

The Certificate of Advanced Studies on Migration and Diversity analyzes changes in social structures and cultural processes owing to migration.

Migration results in diversification that boots enrichment and creates social challenges. The CAS teaches the skills to engage with others and create solutions that turn problems into opportunities. It explores conditions for larger social inclusion.

Migration streams affect all aspects of social life (public institutions, policy-making, businesses, media, health services, religion and ethics, gender and family). This CAS analyzes resulting changes in social structures and cultural processes within nation-states and globally.

The modules cover structural and cultural aspects of migration, integration and diversity including political participation, social mobility and market inequality, inclusion and belonging, governance of international migration, prejudice and stereotyping, refugee processes, policies, health and social needs.

Apply now: https://www.mic.usi.ch/certificate-advanced-studies-migration-and-diversity

it’s called research for a reason!

All credits to Gary King for this one. In a forthcoming piece of advice to grad students, we find this gem:

It will require rewriting, recasting your argument, reconceptualizing your theory, recollecting your evidence, remeasuring your variables, or reanalyzing your data. You’ll have to revise more than you want and you thought possible. But try not to get discouraged; they call it ​re​search, not search, for a reason!