Published: How Political Reception Contexts Shape Location Decisions of Immigrants

Our article on how immigrants decide where to live once they have come to live in a country is now properly published.

Using a conjoint survey experiment with a representative sample of recently arrived immigrants, we established that both political and economic factors play a role in location decisions. In the literature on location choice, economic consideration (e.g., taxes) are often highlighted. Here we show that financial considerations are not everything: the parties in power, the integration policies, etc. also play a role.

The article is available online for everyone to read, but you can also watch a summary:

Bennour, Salomon, Anita Manatschal, and Didier Ruedin. 2022. ‘How Political Reception Contexts Shape Location Decisions of Immigrants’. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 48 (19): 4730–53. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2022.2098468. More.

Job opportunities — The COVID generation: Identifying risks and protective factors for young people’s pathways through the COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland

For the project “The COVID generation: Identifying risks and protective factors for young people’s pathways through the COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland”, the Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences (FORS) and the Institute of Sociology at University of Neuchâtel are recruiting:

– A post-doctoral researcher (80-100%) in Lausanne

– A scientific collaborator (50%) in Neuchâtel

Application deadline: 10th of December.

https://www.researchgate.net/project/The-COVID-generation-Identifying-risks-and-protective-factors-for-young-peoples-pathways-through-the-COVID-19-pandemic-in-Switzerland-2

(Last) Call for Papers: Discrimination as a driver of migration-related inequalities

Deadline closing soon: We have a call for papers open for next year’s IMISCOE conference on “migration and inequalities” (Warsaw, 3-6 July 2023). We propose another set of panels on “discrimination as a driver of migration-related inequalities”.

Deadline: 25 November 2022

Submissions: online form

Full call here:

Monday 8:30

It’s Monday, 8:30, two rejections, one R&R, and two requests to review (one of which I considered spam). Hope you all have a great week!

Out now: Restricting Human Movement during the COVID-19 Pandemic: New Research Avenues in the Study of Mobility, Migration, and Citizenship

I’m happy to announce that our research note on studying border closures and related restrictions to human mobility in the context of Covid-19 is now available at the International Migration Review.

We highlight how restrictions to human mobility were far from uniform across time and countries. The research note identifies 7 different databases that systematically collected information on these restrictions, which should help others identify the right database — they vary in what exactly they cover.

We also present possible research avenues in connection with these data on mobility restrictions: (1) drivers of Covid-19 mobility restrictions, (2) patterns of policy convergence and divergence, (3) the legality of mobility restrictions, (4) continuity and change in global migration policy, (5) citizenship and international mobility rights. In all these cases, data on restrictions during the pandemic can significantly advance research on the governance of mobility, migration, and citizenship.

Piccoli, Lorenzo, Jelena Dzankic, Didier Ruedin, and Timothy Jacobs-Owen. 2022. “Restricting Human Movement during the COVID-19 Pandemic: New Research Avenues in the Study of Mobility, Migration, and Citizenship.” International Migration Review. doi: 10.1177/01979183221118907.