MIPEX since 1848

In a new paper we explore how Swiss immigration and integration policies have developed in Switzerland between 1848 and 2014. The Swiss Political Science Review have done a marvellous job in getting this into print in a astonishing short time (share your experience at scirev…). Policies are covered in true MIPEX style, that is 7 policy areas and a total of 148 indicators. We recorded the situation at the national level for every year, and you can get the full data here.

Ruedin, D., Alberti, C. and D’Amato, G. (2015), Immigration and Integration Policy in Switzerland, 1848 to 2014. Swiss Political Science Review. 21(1): 5-22. doi: 10.1111/spsr.12144

Swiss Immigration and Integration Policies since 1848

mipex1848I’m very excited to announce a new publication outlining Swiss immigration and integration policies since 1848 (yes, that’s 167 years’ worth of data). We use the latest version of the MIPEX questionnaire to trace how immigration and integration policies have developed since the inception of modern Switzerland in 1848. Policies are covered in 7 areas and a total of 148 indicators, with the situation at the national level recorded for every year.

This gives us a more accurate picture of how policies have changed over time than previous efforts, including a limited extension of the MIPEX data to 1995 undertaken as part of the SOM project.

I’m also very happy to announce that the full data are already available, including a detailed description outlining the reasoning and decisions behind the scores.

In the paper we provide a first description of the data: an assessment of Swiss immigration and integration policies at the national level in a systematic and truly historical manner. Three periods of policies are identified; we refer to these as expansive, restricting, and expanding. Indeed, if immigration and integration policies are captured in a broad and multidimensional way, we can see that the highly politicized direct democratic decisions in the past few years have not (yet) had a major impact on Swiss policy. In recent years the expansion of rights seems to have slowed, perhaps stalled, but there is no evidence of overall more restrictive policies.

Ruedin, D., Alberti, C. and D’Amato, G. (2015), Immigration and Integration Policy in Switzerland, 1848 to 2014. Swiss Political Science Review. doi: 10.1111/spsr.12144

Data on Ethnic Group Representation

I regularly get asked whether I’d be willing to share my data on the political representation of ethnic groups in national legislatures. The answer always is yes, as I believe in sharing data. Apart from the appendices in my 2009 article and 2013 monograph, the data are available on my Dataverse. There you can find a spreadsheet with the numbers behind the representation scores. As this is an ongoing project of mine, I do from time to time update my database with better estimates, and also expand coverage. This also means that I’d appreciate possible corrections.