Racism in Switzerland? Yes.

Oddly enough we still seem to discuss whether there is racism in Switzerland. Yes, there is.

Here a few hard facts from the NCCR on the move.

  • Job applicants with Black skin colour on their picture and a name from Cameroon have to send 30% more job applications to get invited for a job interview. They are Swiss citizens. Blog.
  • Job applicants with a name indicating Kosovan ancestors have to send up to 50% more job applications to get invited for a job interview. They are Swiss citizens. Blog.
  • 18% of the Swiss population entitled to vote are of ‘immigrant origin’. In 2015, 13% of the candidates for the National Council had a name suggesting ‘immigrant origin’ — only 6% got elected. Blog.
  • If your name suggests Turkish or Kosovan ancestry, you’re 3-5 percentage points less likely to be invited to view an apartment: There are landlords who do not want to meet you. Blog.

We also have tons of material on the experience of discrimination, experiencing racism, or negative attitudes to immigrants and foreigners.

Image credit: CC-by-sa Quinn Dombrowski

PhD Opportunity at Nijmegen — ethnic inequalities and discrimination in the labor market

A colleague is offering this excellent PhD opportunity at Nijmegen:

The project is on ‘The sources and consequences of beliefs about ethnic inequalities and discrimination in the labor market’. The PhD candidate will join the Department of Sociology at Radboud University Nijmegen and the ICS graduate school.

They are looking for excellent candidates who gradua­ted or will graduate soon in Sociology, Economics, Psychology, Public Administration, Management or related disciplines. Those with strong interests in ethnic labor market inequalities, discrimination, workplace diversity or inclusion policies as well as a strong background in quantitative research methods and interest in collecting data using survey experimental approaches are particularly encouraged to apply.

More information about the project, the ICS graduate school and the application procedure can be found on the ICS website http://ics-graduateschool.nl/vacancies/. More on our department and on the research school within Radboud University of which we are part can be found here www.ru.nl/sociology/ and here www.ru.nl/rscr.

Stuff we do here: TV report on discrimination (in French)

Here’s a short TV report on discrimination in the labour market in Switzerland, drawing on a field study by my (former) colleagues at Neuchâtel:

https://www.rts.ch/info/suisse/11003165-les-suisses-d-origine-etrangere-penalises-sur-le-marche-de-l-emploi.html (in French)

Swiss nationals of foreign origin have to send 30% more applications to get a job interview, according to a study by the University of Neuchâtel. Some communities are more affected, particularly people with family names from the Balkans.

Call for Papers: Discrimination and Racism in Cross-National Perspective — IMISCOE 2020

Discrimination and Racism in Cross-National Perspective

Panel organised at the 17th IMISCOE Annual Conference Luxembourg

30 June – 2 July 2020

Organizers: Patrick Simon (INED), Didier Ruedin (University of Neuchâtel)

For a long time racism has been studied without references to discrimination and was mainly conceived as a specific expression of prejudice. The turn to more subtle and systemic forms of racism has paved the way to the development of studies in terms of ethnic and racial discrimination. This researche on discrimination against immigrants and their descendants in Europe has grown significantly in the last twenty years, paralleling the settlement of immigrant populations. They document differential treatment and discrimination in different markets (e.g. labour market, housing) and social spheres regulated by principles of equality (e.g. school, health service, police). Patterns of discrimination are embedded in institutional contexts and a larger societal environment, characterised not only by economic uncertainties and increasing political polarisation in public debate around immigrant related issues, but also by increasing diversity and opportunities of contact. Such changes in the context are likely to affect attitudes and ideology diffusion in majority and minority members. However, studies about discrimination do not refer specifically to racism, and the methodological gains in measuring discrimination did not transfer directly to the measurement of racism. How far racism and ethnic and racial discrimination are distinct, and how they relate to each other are key issues we would like to explore in this panel.

This workshop will bring together researchers on discrimination and racism, tackling these issues from various disciplines, theoretical backgrounds and methods. We welcome empirical studies of discrimination patterns across a large variety of domains, theoretical perspectives on how the prevalence of ethnic discrimination and racism should be explained and conceptualised, and studies on the consequences of anti-discrimination policies and legislation, in historical perspective as well as in contemporary contexts. We also welcome papers which use and discuss theories about cross-country differences, ethnic hierarchies, and evolution over time, including studies which compare the historical experiences of discrimination and racism among early European immigrants in the US with more recent immigrant groups on both sides of the Atlantic.

Submit your abstract specifying the research question, data, methods and findings (200 words maximum) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0B2Oxgv352FCI9n no later than 25 November 2019. For further information get in touch with Didier Ruedin (didier.ruedin@unine.ch). The notification of acceptance will be made by 30 November 2019.