Call for Papers — Highly skilled migration in the labour market: Brain waste or brain gain?

IMISCOE Annual Conference 30 June – 1 July 2020, Luxembourg

Highly skilled migration is a major phenomenon in a globalized world with important implications for source and destination countries. In the past, most studies have focused on the so-called brain drain (i.e. human capital emigration from developing countries). Here we seek contributions on the phenomenon of brain waste: the underutilization of migrant education and skills in the host country. Such a labour market mismatch is often referred to as over-education, horizontal mismatch between employment and field of education, or simply skills mismatch. Consider the example of a migrant scientist who works as a taxi driver.

We are seeking innovative quantitative papers that examine the (different) reasons and consequences of educational or skills mismatch, either vertical or horizontal, including contributions to better measurement. Possible research questions are the propensity of immigrants to become self-employed as a result of mismatch, their propensity to (re-) migrate due to mismatch, or their likelihood to send remittances, or the eventual consequence of hosting mismatched immigrants for the host labour market. We particularly welcome papers that fully account for the gender dimension of brain waste.

Papers addressing counterfactuals will be specially welcome: the mismatch a migrant would have experienced – if any – if he or she stayed in the country of origin (the migrant scientist working as a taxi driver may not have found adequate employment in the country of origin).

Conference: IMISCOE Annual Conference, 30 June — 1 July 2020, Luxembourg; see http://www.imiscoe.org/ for further information. Conference fee: €200.

Please submit your abstract online (max 200 words) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2iCUqolNCtNiNSt. Deadline: 24 November 2019.

Research group: https://sites.google.com/site/imiscoebrainwaste/

Call as PDF: IMISCOE Brain Waste 2020

Join us! Post-doc related to resilience

Apply now for a post-doc position at the School for Teacher Education FHNW to work on resilience related to a project at the NCCR on the move.

Your duties will be in the context of international research on the development of resilience of students through multivariate quantitative research. You will coordinate research projects, collect data, process and evaluate them statistically. Together with the other team members, you will develop new research proposals, support doctoral students, and be actively involved in peer review publications. The position is initially limited until 31.08.2023.

In addition to an above-average doctorate in educational sciences or psychology, you have excellent quantitative research skills and sound theoretical knowledge in developmental psychology and school education. A very good knowledge of German and English is required. Ability to work in a team, ability to work under pressure, flexibility, efficiency, accuracy and a pronounced research motivation round off your profile.

To apply: https://apply.refline.ch/655298/2225/pub/1/index.html

Deadline: 27 June 2019

For further information: Wassilis Kassis, Head of Research and Development

Join the serious conversation on immigration — CAS Migration and Diversity

Immigration is no doubt a topic high on the political agenda and omni-present in everyday debates. Jointly with the Master of Advanced Studies in Intercultural Communication, Università della Svizzera italiana, the Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies (SFM) of the University of Neuchâtel offers a Certificate in Advanced Studies on Migration and Diversity. There is still time to apply and joint the serious conversation on immigration.

CAS – Migration and Diversity – Leaflet

Education as a Career?

Here’s an idea I’ve had a while back: There are still too many places where children are not going to school, and even if there is free education available to children, parents may prefer or need the short-term gain from sending their children to work instead. What if we paid parents for sending their children to go to school rather than simply provided free education? What if parents were paid if their children learn how to read and write, what if their children being in the top 10% would yield a bonus payment? What if we financially award progress towards getting a job rather than presence at school? We’d obviously change the incentives, but would it work to allow talented children to concentrate on school work? My hunch is that the incentives need not be that big, but perhaps it would lead to unintended consequences like that those who do not get paid would drop out of school because school becomes about external motivation rather than internal motivation.