Peering over the shoulders of recruiters: Hiring discrimination on a recruitment platform

Here’s an exciting new study on hiring discrimination. They got access to the behavioural data of online recruiters to find evidence of discrimination against atypical candidates: Contact rates by recruiters are 4–19% lower for individuals from immigrant and minority ethnic groups, depending on their country of origin, than for citizens from the majority group. Women experience a penalty of 7% in professions that are dominated by men, and the opposite pattern emerges for men in professions that are dominated by women.

I find it interesting that they pitch their method as an alternative to correspondence tests (perhaps not all that novel if we’re looking outside the strict focus on hiring discrimination). We’re seeing an increasing number of correspondence tests in recent years, despite important ethical concerns. Not all of them are reasonably motivated, in my view — “no recent correspondence test” in a particular country/for a particular group/occupation does not cut it for me –, but jointly these studies give us a pretty clear picture of discrimination (especially in Western countries). Access to recruiting databases may not be possible in all countries, and we’re still struggling with the blatant omission of informal labour markets and internal recruitment. On the other hand, at least in principle we could test different interfaces and see if we can reduce discrimination this way…

Switching the default to advertise part-time working boosts applications from women by 16%

Straight from the excellent The Behavioural Insights Team:

They experimentally modified job adverts — “switched the default, so that all new vacancies would be advertised as available for part-time work, or as a job-share, in addition to full-time”

What do you get? “significant increase of 16.4% in the proportion of female applicants”

Full blog post and report: https://www.bi.team/blogs/switching-the-default-to-advertise-part-time-working-boosts-applications-from-women-by-16/

Liza Mügge on Political Science and Gender

Here’s a recent interview where Sanne van Oosten interviews Liza Mügge on political science and gender.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics/article/an-interdisciplinary-and-international-perspective-an-interview-with-liza-mugge/4FC502016AAA6D4C5071A29FE204AE07

Van Oosten, S., & Mügge, L. (2020). AN INTERDISCIPLINARY AND INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE: AN INTERVIEW WITH LIZA MÜGGE. PS: Political Science & Politics, 53(2), 308-309. doi:10.1017/S1049096519002105

Postponed

These days so many things get postponed… today I just managed to come home after some fresh air in the afternoon (it was my day “off” supposedly), made sure everyone had something to do, fire up the video chat application — to find that the online discussion has been postponed just minutes earlier. At least this gave me enough time to prepare dinner…