Reblog: Pandemic-era travel has been restricted worldwide, but not everyone has been affected equally

This is a reblog, originally published on The Loop on 14 April 2021.

International travel restrictions introduced during the pandemic constrained our freedom to travel. To understand how, we must look at the interaction between immigration status, citizenship, employment, and place of residence, write Lorenzo Piccoli, Jelena Dzankic, Timothy Jacob-Owens and Didier Ruedin

Restricting international mobility during the coronacrisis

To contain Covid-19, every government in the world has introduced restrictions on international movement. From late January 2020, these restrictions initially targeted travellers from China. But they quickly expanded to other East Asian countries, then to Iran, Italy, and soon to the entire world. We can see these policies as part of a global ‘regime of mobility’, wherein states have the power to halt movement across international borders.

But the measures did not affect everyone equally. In our project, Citizenship, Migration and Mobility in a Pandemic, we discuss four ways government restrictions to contain SARS-CoV-2 had unequal effects on different groups and individuals.

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Out now! A Global Dataset of COVID-19 Restrictions on Human Movement

I’m very happy to announce a new publication describing a new, global dataset of COVID-19 restrictions on human movement. In the research note, we introduce the Citizenship, Migration and Mobility in a Pandemic (CMMP): A dataset which features systematic information on border closures and domestic lockdowns in response to the Covid-19 outbreak in 211 countries and territories worldwide. We document the evolution of the types and scope of international travel bans and exceptions to them, as well as internal measures including limitations of non-essential movement and curfews in 27 countries.

Now it’s your turn! Can we explain variation in restriction on human movement? Did these restrictions affect the pandemic?

Piccoli, Lorenzo, Jelena Dzankic, and Didier Ruedin. 2021. ‘Citizenship, Migration and Mobility in a Pandemic (CMMP): A Global Dataset of COVID-19 Restrictions on Human Movement’. PLoS ONE. 16(3): e0248066.  Open Access

Reminder — Call for papers: Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste (online workshop): Deadline 20 September

Call for papers

Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste

Online workshop, 6 November 2020, University of Neuchâtel (online)

We are organizing an online workshop on ethnic discrimination and brain waste. This workshop will bring together researchers on ethnic discrimination and brain waste, tackling these issues from various disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and methods. We welcome empirical studies of discrimination patterns across a large variety of domains, and studies on the consequences of anti-discrimination policies and legislation. Other contributions may focus on how to better measure skills-mismatch, the propensity of immigrants to become self-employed as a result of over-education, the propensity to (re-)migrate due to over-education, or their likelihood to send remittances. We are particularly keen on contributions that fully account for the gender dimension of discrimination and brain waste.

Submit your abstract specifying the research question, data, methods and findings (200 words maximum) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0xpW57JWD4F1fox no later than 20 September 2020. For further information get in touch with Didier Ruedin (didier.ruedin@unine.ch). The workshop will take place online (Webex), no conference fee.

Full call as PDF: CfP_2020_Discrimination and Brain Waste

Reminder: Call for Survey Questions & Experiments

This is a reminder for the call for a joint survey, building to a joint publication.

You can contribute (a) survey questions, (b) designs for survey experiments, and (c) interest in survey analysis in the following areas:

— The role of limited information in decisions to migrate
— Aspirations and abilities to migrate
— The role of different narratives of migration
— Immobility (inability or lack of motivation to move)
— Research on the role of trust in migration decisions
— Health and migration

The survey will probably be fielded in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, or a combination of these countries in October 2020.

You are embedded in a university in a Subsaharan African
country or in Switzerland, and study human migration in any relevant discipline.

Deadline: 4 September 2020

Online form: http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9ulRPsbrISMoJSJ

For further information on the Swiss-Subsaharan Africa Migration Network (S-SAM): http://www.unine.ch/sfm/home/formation/ssam.html