Now published in Migration Studies: Higher share of immigrants in one’s occupation = more negative attitudes

Our article is now properly published at Migration Studies. Not satisfied that “threat” and “competition” with foreigners is typically reduced to a measure of education (!), we sought a realistic measure of competition. So we examine the relationship between the share of foreigners at the occupational level — a much more relevant unit of analysis than education levels or the share of foreigners in a geographical unit — and negative attitudes to immigrants. We use objective measures of pressures in the labour-market: the unemployment rate in one’s occupation. At this stage, we find support for “threat” in that a higher share of immigrants is associated with more negative attitudes.

But we didn’t stop there. We find that this relationship can probably be accounted for by sorting on job quality — particularly the association with objective pressures. This sorting is a consequence of selective migration policies, but we also show that the association between the occupational share of foreigners and attitudes decreases for workers with better job prospects: This implies that workers welcome foreigners to overcome labour market shortages. Put differently, we show that workers seem to react to immigrants in a nuanced way.

Pecoraro, Marco, and Didier Ruedin. 2016. ‘A Foreigner Who Does Not Steal My Job: The Role of Unemployment Risk and Values in Attitudes toward Equal Opportunities’. International Migration Review 50 (3): 628–66. https://doi.org/10.1111/imre.12162.
———. 2020. ‘Occupational Exposure to Foreigners and Attitudes towards Equal Opportunities’. Migration Studies 8 (3): 382–423. https://doi.org/10.1093/migration/mnz006.

Reminder: Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste (deadline: 20 September 2020)

Call for papers

Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste

Online workshop, 6 November 2020, University of Neuchâtel (online)

We are organizing an online workshop on ethnic discrimination and brain waste. This workshop will bring together researchers on ethnic discrimination and brain waste, tackling these issues from various disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and methods. We welcome empirical studies of discrimination patterns across a large variety of domains, and studies on the consequences of anti-discrimination policies and legislation. Other contributions may focus on how to better measure skills-mismatch, the propensity of immigrants to become self-employed as a result of over-education, the propensity to (re-)migrate due to over-education, or their likelihood to send remittances. We are particularly keen on contributions that fully account for the gender dimension of discrimination and brain waste.

Submit your abstract specifying the research question, data, methods and findings (200 words maximum) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0xpW57JWD4F1fox no later than 20 September 2020. For further information get in touch with Didier Ruedin (didier.ruedin@unine.ch). The workshop will take place online (Webex), no conference fee.

Full call as PDF: CfP_2020_Discrimination and Brain Waste

Reminder — Call for papers: Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste (online workshop): Deadline 20 September

Call for papers

Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste

Online workshop, 6 November 2020, University of Neuchâtel (online)

We are organizing an online workshop on ethnic discrimination and brain waste. This workshop will bring together researchers on ethnic discrimination and brain waste, tackling these issues from various disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and methods. We welcome empirical studies of discrimination patterns across a large variety of domains, and studies on the consequences of anti-discrimination policies and legislation. Other contributions may focus on how to better measure skills-mismatch, the propensity of immigrants to become self-employed as a result of over-education, the propensity to (re-)migrate due to over-education, or their likelihood to send remittances. We are particularly keen on contributions that fully account for the gender dimension of discrimination and brain waste.

Submit your abstract specifying the research question, data, methods and findings (200 words maximum) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0xpW57JWD4F1fox no later than 20 September 2020. For further information get in touch with Didier Ruedin (didier.ruedin@unine.ch). The workshop will take place online (Webex), no conference fee.

Full call as PDF: CfP_2020_Discrimination and Brain Waste

Call for papers: Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste (online workshop)

Call for papers

Ethnic Discrimination and Brain Waste

Online workshop, 6 November 2020, University of Neuchâtel (online)

We are organizing an online workshop on ethnic discrimination and brain waste. This workshop will bring together researchers on ethnic discrimination and brain waste, tackling these issues from various disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and methods. We welcome empirical studies of discrimination patterns across a large variety of domains, and studies on the consequences of anti-discrimination policies and legislation. Other contributions may focus on how to better measure skills-mismatch, the propensity of immigrants to become self-employed as a result of over-education, the propensity to (re-)migrate due to over-education, or their likelihood to send remittances. We are particularly keen on contributions that fully account for the gender dimension of discrimination and brain waste.

Submit your abstract specifying the research question, data, methods and findings (200 words maximum) at http://neuchatel.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0xpW57JWD4F1fox no later than 20 September 2020. For further information get in touch with Didier Ruedin (didier.ruedin@unine.ch). The workshop will take place online (Webex), no conference fee.

Full call as PDF: CfP_2020_Discrimination and Brain Waste

Racism in Switzerland? Yes.

Oddly enough we still seem to discuss whether there is racism in Switzerland. Yes, there is.

Here a few hard facts from the NCCR on the move.

  • Job applicants with Black skin colour on their picture and a name from Cameroon have to send 30% more job applications to get invited for a job interview. They are Swiss citizens. Blog.
  • Job applicants with a name indicating Kosovan ancestors have to send up to 50% more job applications to get invited for a job interview. They are Swiss citizens. Blog.
  • 18% of the Swiss population entitled to vote are of ‘immigrant origin’. In 2015, 13% of the candidates for the National Council had a name suggesting ‘immigrant origin’ — only 6% got elected. Blog.
  • If your name suggests Turkish or Kosovan ancestry, you’re 3-5 percentage points less likely to be invited to view an apartment: There are landlords who do not want to meet you. Blog.

We also have tons of material on the experience of discrimination, experiencing racism, or negative attitudes to immigrants and foreigners.

Image credit: CC-by-sa Quinn Dombrowski