Plot and boxplot in R without borders

R can be pretty counter-intuitive at times, usually for historical reasons. Here’s one I’ve forgotten several times: drawing a plot and a boxplot without the border/box around it. The default (top row) is the plot with a border/box around it.

For the plot() function, we need the argument bty=”n”, that’s the box type “n” (for none, I guess). For the boxplot, we need frame=FALSE, which behind the scenes sets the same graphical parameter. Oddly enough, frame=FALSE is not mentioned in the help on the boxplot() function.

The precise code for these plots: a bunch of values in myvalues, some random values in xrandom to spread out the points, and then this:

par(mfrow=c(2,2)) # 2 x 2 plots
plot(myvalues ~ xrandom, xlim=c(0.5, 1.5), xlab="", ylab="")
boxplot(myvalues, xlim=c(0.5, 1.5), xlab="", ylab="")
plot(myvalues ~ xrandom, xlim=c(0.5, 1.5), xlab="", ylab="", bty="n")
boxplot(myvalues, xlim=c(0.5, 1.5), xlab="", ylab="", frame=FALSE)

Job opportunities: Structural racism & discrimination (PhD & Postdoc)

Over at the new EqualStrength project, they are hiring 1 PhD and 1 postdoc.

EqualStrength is a Horizon Europe project funded by the European Union. This research project investigates cumulative and structural forms of discrimination, outgroup prejudice and hate crimes against ethnic, racial and religious minorities.

Objectives of the project:

  1. reveal structural and cumulative forms of ethnic and racial discrimination in Europe
  2. assess the systemic nature of prejudice across life domains
  3. analyse policy and institutional factors that contribute to structural discrimination
  4. document the experiences and coping strategies
  5. highlight the intersection of race, ethnicity and religion with other dimensions of inequality

https://equalstrength.eu/opportunities.html

Structural Racism in Switzerland: A Scoping Review

I’m happy to announce the publication of a research report on structural racism in Switzerland. The empirical core of the study are interviews as well as a scoping review that identified N=304 studies on structural racism in Switzerland (in broad terms).

Importantly, we focused on empirical evidence in Switzerland, because frankly, there is no need to look elsewhere to find structural racism.

The studies were classified by method, life sphere, how they classify the population, and a GRADE-style assessment of risk of bias. Conceptually, we draw on a frame by Osta and Vasquez (2021), which allows us to identify components of structural racism and connections between these components. All methods identify racial inequalities, racialized practices, or racist stereotypes across spheres and groups. In Switzerland, many studies draw on migration and nationality as classification, and most studies provide partial evidence. When considered jointly, however, the existing literature provides a clear picture consistent with structural racism.

The report is available in German and French (Italian will follow shortly), but unusually we also have an English summary/technical appendix to the scoping review available.

Mugglin, Leonie, Denise Efionayi-Mäder, Didier Ruedin, and Gianni D’Amato. 2022. ‘Grundlagenstudie zu strukturellem Rassismus in der Schweiz’. SFM Studies 81. Neuchâtel: Swiss Forum for Migration and Population Studies.

Mugglin, Leonie, and Didier Ruedin. 2022. ‘Structural Racism in Switzerland: A Scoping Review’. SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/vnz6h.

Osta, Kathleen, and Hugh Vasquez. 2021. ‘Implicit Bias and Structural Racialization’. Oakland: National Equity Project. https://www.nationalequityproject.org/frameworks/implicit-bias-structural-racialization.

Blog: How can previous public health emergencies help us understand the COVID-19 travel restrictions?

Over at GLOBALCIT, we have a blog post on our recent research note on Covid-19 travel restrictions. We ask what we can learn from previous public health emergencies, and use this as the basis to discuss 5 research avenues that can advance our understanding of the effects of a public health emergency on the global mobility regime.

Read on here: https://globalcit.eu/how-can-previous-public-health-emergencies-help-us-understand-the-covid-19-travel-restrictions/

Read the research note: https://doi.org/10.1177/01979183221118907

Piccoli, Lorenzo, Jelena Dzankic, Timothy Jacobs-Owen, and Didier Ruedin. 2022. ‘Restricting Human Movement during the COVID-19 Pandemic: New Research Avenues in the Study of Mobility, Migration, and Citizenship’. International Migration Review. https://doi.org/10.1177/01979183221118907

Video abstract: The different ways in which countries restricted movement during Covid-19

Video abstract on our research note: Restricting Human Movement during the COVID-19 Pandemic: New Research Avenues in the Study of Mobility, Migration, and Citizenship. With Lorenzo Piccoli, Jelena Dzankic, and Timothy Jacobs-Owen.

Piccoli, Lorenzo, Jelena Dzankic, Didier Ruedin, and Timothy Jacobs-Owen. 2022. “Restricting Human Movement during the COVID-19 Pandemic: New Research Avenues in the Study of Mobility, Migration, and Citizenship.” International Migration Review. doi: 10.1177/01979183221118907. More